Film Review: “Captain Fantastic” (2016)

These days, it somtimes feels like it's impossible to find a film that doesn't try to drown you in special effects and just focuses on telling a genuinely good story. If you're lucky enough to live in a city with a decent film scene, it is still possible to find that endangered species known as … Continue reading Film Review: “Captain Fantastic” (2016)

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Appreciating Space: “Minecraft” and Empowerment

Metathesis

For the last two summers, I’ve worked as an instructor for the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Kid College program, which is basically a mix between a summer camp and course series about technology for kids aged 9-14. Most of the classes I taught were about game design, and the most popular courses by far were the ones about Minecraft. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the game, it might be described as an infinitely large, semi-randomly-generated world made up of multiple types of blocks that players can use to build structures, craft items, and fight off monsters. I tended to describe it to parents or adults as “digital Legos with fighting and exploration mixed in.” (Avid players might say it is a bit more complicated than that, but let’s work with that for now.)

In the course of teaching, I have occasionally had parents voice the concern that…

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The Great “Golden Girls” Marathon: “Nice and Easy” (S1, Ep. 17)

It's become something of a recurring theme in these posts that I discuss the importance of family to so many of the storylines in The Golden Girls, and today's post is no different. In today's episode, we get to meet Blanche's (rather obnoxious) niece Lucy, who quickly shows that she has taken her aunt's example to hear … Continue reading The Great “Golden Girls” Marathon: “Nice and Easy” (S1, Ep. 17)

Exploring Space: A Walk among the Gravestones

Metathesis

I suppose it speaks to my interest in the virtual that I wrote a whole post about spatiality last week without moving an inch. On the surface, that doesn’t seem quite in line with the so-called “spatial turn” I mentioned in my last post: the trend in humanities scholarship towards the importance of place and space to ideas and power. Then again, many of the concepts we associate with the spatial – the panoptic nature of surveillance, the power of the wanderer versus a top-down view of the world, the distinction between geographic space and humanized place, that sort of thing – were probably for the most part mulled over in armchairs, in the mindscape of the scholar. I wonder how much all things are born from the virtual…

I was probably thinking something along those lines as my phone announced it was beginning to die. Yanked out of my…

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Viewing History: “The Greeks” at the National Geographic Museum

I recently had the pleasure of attending the exhibit entitled "The Greeks:  From Agamemnon to Alexander the Great" at the National Geographic Museum. As a lifelong devotee of the classics and an avid museum-goer, it was quite compelling to see the world of the ancient Greeks brought to life, with a number of exquisite artifacts … Continue reading Viewing History: “The Greeks” at the National Geographic Museum

Imagining Space: America the Virtual

Metathesis

I went on a run today—something I mean to do more often than I actually do, it seems—and my feet took me down a familiar route to Oakwood Cemetery. On my way down the looping paths, I saw a crumpled piece of red and white fabric on the side of the trail. It was a tiny, tattered American flag, the type mourners like to put by the gravestones of loved ones who have served.

I stopped and picked it up, turning the torn, cheap fabric in my hands over and over again. The object struck a strange chord with me, and I ended up sitting on the steps of a mausoleum and just staring at it until my phone battery drained down to 10%. The entire time, I didn’t notice a single person walk by.

A lot was going through my head then, and still more is going through it…

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“Isn’t That All in the Past?”: History and the Privilege of Cultural Amnesia

Metathesis

As I’ve been stressing throughout this month’s series of posts, privilege works in a number of pernicious and insidious ways in our everyday lives. Much as we might collectively like to believe that it doesn’t exist, it is only by dragging it kicking and screaming into the piercing light of day and scholarly/critical inquiry that we can begin to undo the pernicious ways in which it renders itself invisible. Indeed, it is precisely through rendering it visible that we can both deconstruct privilege and the systematic inequalities that it renders possible.

This week, I want to talk about the ways in which history can also be a locus of different types of privilege. Though this might appear counterintuitive to some (how can history be a site of privilege?), I would argue that history is always saturated with various types of privilege and raises significant questions about the function that history…

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