Screening Classic Hollywood: “I Want to Live!” (1958)

Warning: Full spoilers for the film follow. I've been wanting to watch I Want to Live! for quite some time now, if for no other reason than that it's referenced twice in The Golden Girls (always a solid reason to watch a film, IMO). Well, I did, and I have to say, I was enraptured … Continue reading Screening Classic Hollywood: “I Want to Live!” (1958)

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Screening Classic Hollywood: “The Seven Year Itch” (1955) and the Puncturing of Hegemonic Masculinity

Billy Wilder is one of my favourite classic Hollywood directors. All of his movies--from Double Indemnity to Sunset Boulevard--crackle and snap with an energy all their own. Wilder had a keen eye for searing away the patina of conformity and niceness of American culture to lay bare the hypocrisy and rot beneath. While at first glance a comedy … Continue reading Screening Classic Hollywood: “The Seven Year Itch” (1955) and the Puncturing of Hegemonic Masculinity

Screening Classic Hollywood: “Auntie Mame” (1958)

I miss many things about classic Hollywood, but one of the greatest casualties was the opening credit sequence. In fine classic Hollywood style, the opening to Auntie Mame is a riot of colors, designs, and patterns, a harbinger of the flamboyant personality embodied by Mame herself. But perhaps I'm getting ahead of myself. When his father unexpectedly … Continue reading Screening Classic Hollywood: “Auntie Mame” (1958)

Screening Classic Hollywood: “My Darling Clementine” (1946)

Today in classic Hollywood, I'm writing about My Darling Clementine, one of John Ford's finest westerns and a stellar example of the postwar iteration of America's favourite genre. Directed by John Ford (the western director par excellence), the film details the events leading up to the famous showdown at the OK Corral. It stars Henry Fonda as … Continue reading Screening Classic Hollywood: “My Darling Clementine” (1946)

Screening Classic Hollywood: “Anastasia” (1956)

I've always had a fascination with the legend of Anastasia Romanov, the youngest daughter of the doomed Nicholas and Alexandra who was rumoured, for much of the 20th Century, to have survived the massacre that struck her family. Before there was the exquisite Anastasia of animated fame, there was the 1956 film starring Yul Brynner and Ingrid … Continue reading Screening Classic Hollywood: “Anastasia” (1956)