Book Review: “Beren and Luthien” (by J.R.R. Tolkien)

Anyone who's ever read anything about Tolkien knows the story of Luthien, the tale of an Elf maiden who fell in love with the mortal man Beren and ultimately sacrificed her immortality to be with him. Their sage is, of course, intertwined with those fantastic gems known as the Silmarils, one of which they managed … Continue reading Book Review: “Beren and Luthien” (by J.R.R. Tolkien)

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What Tolkien Taught Me About Writing

As anyone who reads this blog with any regularity knows, I am both a fan of Tolkien and an aspiring writer of epic fantasy. In fact, it was first reading Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings that in part inspired me to try my own hand at not just writing an epic fantasy, but undertaking the … Continue reading What Tolkien Taught Me About Writing

Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “Journey to the Cross-Roads,” “The Stairs of Cirith Ungol,” and “Shelob’s Lair”

In today's entry, we follow Frodo and his companions as they make their way beyond Ithilien and cross into the dark Morgul Vale, where they see the fearsome Lord of the Nazgûl ride out at the head of an army that has at last been unleashed upon the forces of the West, before encountering the … Continue reading Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “Journey to the Cross-Roads,” “The Stairs of Cirith Ungol,” and “Shelob’s Lair”

Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “The Window on the West” and “The Forbidden Pool”

Having met the noble Gondorian captain Faramir and his men, we now get to see them in more detail, as Frodo and Sam are welcomed into their abode and treated as guests of honor. They are also treated to the beauty of the land of Ithilien, including the cave where Faramir and his company have … Continue reading Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “The Window on the West” and “The Forbidden Pool”

Through a Glass Darkly: The Diminution of Heroism in Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy

After recently rewatching Peter Jackson's rightfully famous and well-regarded The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, it occurred to me that Jackson's heroes are remarkably less lofty than their counterparts in Tolkien's novel. If Tolkien's heroes seem to exist in a time wherein heroes were larger than life figures that seem to defy the laws of humanity, … Continue reading Through a Glass Darkly: The Diminution of Heroism in Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy

Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit.”

As we make our way again through The Lord of the Rings, we come at last to the fateful encounter between Frodo and Sam and Faramir, Boromir's younger brother and the leading captain of Gondor. We also get a glimpse, albeit briefly, of the fragrant and peaceful glades of Ithilien. Among his many strengths as a writer, … Continue reading Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit.”

Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “The Taming of Smeagol,” “The Passage of the Marshes,” and “The Black Gate is Closed”

For a long time now, I've always preferred the first part of The Two Towers to the second. Maybe this has to do with the way in which I remain profoundly dissatisfied with Jackson's interpretation of it in the film version, or perhaps because it lacks the big action set-pieces of the other half. Whatever the reason, … Continue reading Reading “The Lord of the Rings”: “The Taming of Smeagol,” “The Passage of the Marshes,” and “The Black Gate is Closed”